BridgeUSA

  • Ut Semper ad Mortem
    I truly and deeply resisted the notion of offering my opinions on the Orlando shooting. I think that such views generally serve only to arouse anger. Certainly this one will. What I am about to say will infuriate (and should infuriate) just about everyone.But I am wallowing in some strange place among fury, heartache, and helplessness. I am sickened that I have become accustomed to this feeling, as I am sure many are. It’s well past time to put our reservations aside and say what we believe needs to be said. This is my longest post to date, ladies and ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-08-26By Patrick Kearney
  • Ut Semper ad Mortem
    I truly and deeply resisted the notion of offering my opinions on the Orlando shooting. I think that such views generally serve only to arouse anger. Certainly this one will. What I am about to say will infuriate (and should infuriate) just about everyone.But I am wallowing in some strange place among fury, heartache, and helplessness. I am sickened that I have become accustomed to this feeling, as I am sure many are. It’s well past time to put our reservations aside and say what we believe needs to be said. This is my longest post to date, ladies and ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-08-26By Patrick Kearney
  • Breaking the Cycle
    The most disquieting aspect of the tragic occurrence in Orlando is that the worst terrorist attack since 9/11 will result in no substantive policy change. Instead, it will follow the same cyclical path of reaction as shootings such as Sandy Hook, and – before we know it – our society will have moved on entirely.By now we all know what to expect when a tragedy of this scale occurs in our nation’s backyard: the heartfelt, patriotic social media posts and up-to-the-minute coverage of the event will soon give way to political partisans on both sides of the isle assigning blame ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-06-14By Roge Karma
  • Breaking the Cycle
    The most disquieting aspect of the tragic occurrence in Orlando is that the worst terrorist attack since 9/11 will result in no substantive policy change. Instead, it will follow the same cyclical path of reaction as shootings such as Sandy Hook, and – before we know it – our society will have moved on entirely.By now we all know what to expect when a tragedy of this scale occurs in our nation’s backyard: the heartfelt, patriotic social media posts and up-to-the-minute coverage of the event will soon give way to political partisans on both sides of the isle assigning blame ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-06-14By Roge Karma
  • Identity Wars, Part II
    In my last post, Identity Wars, Part I, I promised to give a more detailed discussion of the impending consequences that I see of the widespread acceptance of the identity movement, and all that it entails.Before going down that road, however, we ought to explore another element of the identity movement, something that I was unable to cover in the last segment. While we spoke of the one-person tribalism that sets the identity movement upon itself, something still must be said of the movement’s curious lexicon.What is interesting about the language of the identity movement is not the novelty of its ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-06-02By Patrick Kearney
  • Identity Wars, Part II
    In my last post, Identity Wars, Part I, I promised to give a more detailed discussion of the impending consequences that I see of the widespread acceptance of the identity movement, and all that it entails.Before going down that road, however, we ought to explore another element of the identity movement, something that I was unable to cover in the last segment. While we spoke of the one-person tribalism that sets the identity movement upon itself, something still must be said of the movement’s curious lexicon.What is interesting about the language of the identity movement is not the novelty of its ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-06-02By Patrick Kearney
  • Shallow Waters
    Everyone has heard the common expression “Don’t judge a book by its cover”, but it seems that the expectation we so often hold to people and things on the account of their surface appearance no longer applies when it comes to politics.  It is often on college campuses today that we hear people make sweeping generalizations about those in a political group and place judgment on a person based on one political view.  How many times do we hear sentences beginning with “People who oppose gay marriage…” or “People who support legal abortion…” or “People who are voting for X ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-05-31By Mimi Teixeira
  • Shallow Waters
    Everyone has heard the common expression “Don’t judge a book by its cover”, but it seems that the expectation we so often hold to people and things on the account of their surface appearance no longer applies when it comes to politics.  It is often on college campuses today that we hear people make sweeping generalizations about those in a political group and place judgment on a person based on one political view.  How many times do we hear sentences beginning with “People who oppose gay marriage…” or “People who support legal abortion…” or “People who are voting for X ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-05-31By Mimi Teixeira
  • Identity Wars, Part I
    This last week, at DePaul University, conservative Milo Yiannopoulos was invited to give a speech by the College Republicans. His talk, however, was met with stiff resistance from student protestors, and was promptly canceled. Depending on which media outlets one frequents, you are likely to come across one of two narratives:Firstly - the College Republican’s speaker was set upon by barbaric social justice warriors, those that claim to crusade for the rights of the downtrodden, so long as those minorities don’t happen to espouse right-leaning beliefs, such as the gay Mr. Yiannopoulos.Or secondly - student protests prohibited a vile, racist, and ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-05-28By Patrick Kearney
  • Identity Wars, Part I
    This last week, at DePaul University, conservative Milo Yiannopoulos was invited to give a speech by the College Republicans. His talk, however, was met with stiff resistance from student protestors, and was promptly canceled. Depending on which media outlets one frequents, you are likely to come across one of two narratives:Firstly - the College Republican’s speaker was set upon by barbaric social justice warriors, those that claim to crusade for the rights of the downtrodden, so long as those minorities don’t happen to espouse right-leaning beliefs, such as the gay Mr. Yiannopoulos.Or secondly - student protests prohibited a vile, racist, and ... (Read More)
    Source: BridgeUSAPublished on 2016-05-28By Patrick Kearney

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